Last edited by Zolojind
Wednesday, May 20, 2020 | History

5 edition of Inuit Mythology (Mythology (Berkeley Heights, N.J.).) found in the catalog.

Inuit Mythology (Mythology (Berkeley Heights, N.J.).)

by Evelyn Wolfson

  • 382 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by Enslow Publishers .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Legends, Myths, & Fables - Other,
  • Social Science - Folklore & Mythology,
  • Juvenile Nonfiction,
  • Children"s Books/Ages 9-12 Fiction,
  • Eskimos,
  • Folklore,
  • Inuit,
  • Inuit mythology,
  • Juvenile literature,
  • Children: Grades 4-6

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsWilliam Sauts Bock (Illustrator)
    The Physical Object
    FormatLibrary Binding
    Number of Pages128
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL10936819M
    ISBN 100766015599
    ISBN 109780766015593

    Inuit culture is a reflection of the harsh environment in which the Inuit live. The Inuit were nomads, travelling from place to place, looking for that might offer more food as the seasons and fortunes changed. Almost no trees and few plants grow in the Arctic and therefore meat is the main source of food. Growing crops is almost Size: KB. published in the s or All of the books are excellent in terms of quality (several are awards winners) and engaging for the young reader with beautiful illustrations. Each book also serves as an introduction to Inuit mythology, the history of the NorthwestFile Size: 20KB.

    Inuit mythology related to the natural wonders of the Arctic. The Aurora Borealis, or northern lights, were of particular mystery to the Inuit. Some believed that the faces of ancestors could be seen dancing within the swirling colors of the lights, while others believed the lights to be more deadly in nature. Fiction Mythology Inuit families snuggled together in their winter houses listening to storytellers fill the long cold nights with tales about a time when unbelievable things could happen. These adventurers broke up the long hours of winter darkness and gave the listeners a cultural and traditional heritage.

    Imagine Inuit kids gripping a copy of the latest book about evil, red-eyed shapeshifting spirits, instead of tales of American superheroes, like Spiderman or the Hulk. Sound far-fetched? That’s the scenario that a dedicated bunch of artists and teachers are trying to make . amisuujuugaluat uqausiuruluujaqatarningit ijirait qanuittuuninginnik, atausirli nalunangillariktuq: katitaulauqtilugit ijirait inuit iqqaumaniqattiarunniiqatarktut ammalu puigurksarailirk?utik qanuiqqaugaluarmangaarmik.


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Inuit Mythology (Mythology (Berkeley Heights, N.J.).) by Evelyn Wolfson Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Mythology of the Inuit serves as a nice primer for readers wishing to learn more about the stories different tribes of Inuit and Aleutian people told, and how those stories reflect their culture. The author Evelyn Wolfson prefaces the Sidling closer to the glow of the seal blubber lamp, families in the Arctic regions would pass the long hours of cold darkness by telling stories/5.

This book is very interesting, it tells many stories of the most important about the Inuit mythology. It is written for everybody, and offers many hours of reading to delight ourselves with a subject we don't really know, and that we should know better.4/5(1).

This book is developed from INUIT MYTHOLOGY to allow republication of the original text into ebook, paperback, and trade editions. Read more Read less The Amazon Book ReviewAuthor: Evelyn Wolfson. Find a huge variety of new & used Inuit mythology books online including bestsellers & rare titles at the best prices.

Shop Inuit mythology books at Alibris. A collection of ancient Inuit myths. In this exhaustive story collection, the rich tradition of Inuit storytelling becomes accessible to the rest of Canada for the first time.

Unipkaaqtut is the Inuit word meaning "to tell stories."/5(14). This exhaustive story collection Inuit Mythology book the rich tradition of Inuit storytelling accessible to the rest of Canada for the first time. From creation myths to animal fables, Unikkaaqtuat gives non-Inuit readers a thorough introduction to the world of Inuit traditional stories.

This definitive collection of legends and myths is thoughtfully introduced and carefully annotated/5. My son picked out this book to have something to pass around to his classmates during his presentation.

He has read it several times, and has learned so many new facts Inuit Mythology book didn't find through our studies of the Inuit. It is a very well put together book, and perfect for the 3rd grader in your life.

The pictures are very beautiful/5(7). About the Author. Joel Rudinger earned a Masters Degree in English Literature from the University of Alaska in Fairbanks where he worked with native Athabaskin Indians and Eskimos. An Eskimo girl introduced him to the folklore and mythology of Alaska natives/5(3).

The Qikiqtani Inuit Association (QIA) works hard to promote and protect Inuit culture. QIA has developedto provide a resource for Nunavummiut and people from around the world who want to learn more about the Inuit storytelling tradition.

The stories told by Inuit elders are full of fantastic creatures, spirits and strange beings. Here are some examples of a few characters from our rich northern mythology. Stories and details vary from region to region in the north.

If you want to learn more about these mythological characters and elemental beings, talk to the elders in your. Lists about: YA Books inspired by Non-Western/Eastern Mythology, The Queen's Library: Best of the Commonwealth, Alaska in YA & Middle Grade Fiction, Indi.

Get this from a library. Inuit mythology. [Evelyn Wolfson] -- Explains how Inuit oral traditions have kept these myths and many others like them alive for generations.

Inuit families snuggled together in their winter houses listening to storytellers fill the. This audiobook is dedicated to exploring the gods and goddesses the Inuit people and Eskimos worshiped, and within the program, you will find more information about: Inuit myths about the creation of the world.

The intriguing stories and legends of Nanuk and Sedna. The Inuit religion and how it. Actual rating: stars Below is presented as a dark YA fantasy inspired by Inuit mythology.

Honestly, I had no clue about the Inuit mythology before I picked this book up, but I can say that the premise is true: Below is really dark and cold - frigid - and the Inuit culture plays a significant role in the story/5.

Myths, legends, historical accounts, and storytelling have been part of the Inuit culture for centuries. In the winter, people gather in a qagip (a giant snow house) and in the summer outdoors to celebrate and have games and storytelling.

Stories are often accompanied by a song that describes an event or helps to explain the purpose of a story. Inuit mythology is almost criminally neglected.

Personally I find it fascinating and there is so much underappreciated information to be passed along that I will no doubt wind up having two pages devoted to it as I do with Vietnamese mythology. As always my source books are listed at the bottom of the page. Inuit is the term used now.

An Amarok, or Amaroq, is a gigantic wolf in Inuit mythology, said to stalk and devour any person foolish enough to hunt alone at night. Unlike wolves who hunt in packs, amaroks hunt alone.

Unlike wolves who hunt in packs, amaroks hunt alone. Below is an incomplete list of Inuit deities believed to hold power over some specific part of the Inuit world: Agloolik: evil god of the sea who can flip boats over; spirit which lives under the ice and helps wanderers in hunting Akna: mother goddess of fertility Amaguq / Amarok: wolf god who.

Books. Canadian children's literature author Robert Munsch featured the Qalupalik in his book A Promise is a Promise, co-authored with Inuit writer Michael Kusugak and illustrated by Vladyana Krykorka.

The protagonist of the story is caught by the Qalupalik (spelled "Qallupilluit" in the book) and promises to bring all her siblings to them.

In some parts of the Inuit homelands, the highest Heaven is the Aurora, where people who died violent deaths could enjoy an otherworld of peace and plenty (3).

The Inuits of Hudson Bay in Canada have another traditional tale linking the Aurora and the Afterlife: In their view, the Aurora is the reflection of the spirits of the departed entering.

Told by Inuit and non-Inuit Arctic residents, these children's books share stories, knowledge, and record the oral history of Inuit.

Arctic voices and themes are heard through each story as they ensure that the rich story-telling culture of the Inuit is preserved and passed on, including traditional knowledge about the environment and oral history.Pages in category "Inuit mythology" The following 33 pages are in this category, out of 33 total.

This list may not reflect recent changes ().INUIT CREATION. Raven created a huge bear from the same clay, to make sure Man had something to fear.

After a few days, Raven noticed that Man was lonely. Raven went off to a quiet corner of the earth where Man couldn’t see what he was doing.

He started building a figure out of clay. It looked like Man but was smaller and Size: KB.